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were their sort of elements where we agree and hing,f t that will help us understand g in iraq or afghanistan or other conflicts, think if you want a of the viet nam war it is worth the to work like this that will help triet .. .. this is just under an hour. [applause] shalom, good evening, everybody. it's my pleasure to be with uiq. i'm very happy to see so many people coming here and showing an interest in my boat i would like in the next 20 minutes to show we do not want this in the book, but behind the idea. we can all agree with happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election he
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli war that will take the pressure off them for a little bit, coe aless the people around israel and soing for. that's the dooms day scenario. >> wonderful, thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> this event took place at the 17th annual book festival in austin, texas
: the fall of the house oo assad." >> thank you so much foruch for spending part of your afternoony with us here.s i would like to welcome you alle on behalf of the professor and myself. this is afessor l wesonderful s. i'm saying that dispassionately, and we're so happy you're here.r i wanted to introduce the profe professor to you. he is asch to professor of middt history at trinity university it san antonio. professor lesch is a prolific writer writer and thinker about the the middle east and what's happening in the region. it's really a treat tosy a havem here today.he h w he's written his new book n b "syria: the fall of the house ou assad" which i'm hoping you'll m all purchase and get him toill sign. he signed my copy first so he f. has met extensively with met president assad and officials lg between 2004-2011, been in the middle east, studying the middle st east, making connections andeast friendships in the middle east for a quar ater century. the r why that's important is, of course, he knows of what he knoo speaks. spe there's so many people who woule like to write about a regio
that told the story. the war blur that richard nixon used to trap him in the cross-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions
, christian. he used to send $15 a month to some little build israel organization. when my mother thought we didn't have enough money to send it, he sent it anyway. so always thought -- >> you didn't talk? >> i found out later. but i thought i would go with him, but he died before it worked out. so i was action on a trip in 2006, and i was in nuevo, a beach from which you can see saudi arabia, jordan and israel. year in egypt and i thought if i don't get myself there, i'm never going. i'm going to be like moses having seen the land that never entered. [laughter] and i made a reservation with the mileage i had. i decided instead of doing some dumb sure, i would rent an apartment for a few months and just take my work with me, since i write, i could do that, which i did. i did know anyone there. i didn't have one in. i have teams, i didn't know anybody. and as i said i ended up going during a war, but it wasn't even sure what was going to happen. i stayed because i love it and it didn't need to come back. i mean, i would come back to work every few months, but i met somebody good friends. i ha
cook. [applause] thank you all very much for joining us today. [inaudible conversations] >> now on c-span2, we bring you booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books. here are some programs to look out for this weekend. at noon in light of congress discussing the so-called fiscal cliff, booktv highlights a few programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit booktv.org. >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced
i think my mom for flying in today. thank you so much for everyone joining us today and we will see you outside. .. was a very tough irish catholic, italian catholic town from a very traditional in many ways in the first beta of hippies that came to the city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids can get treatment with a drug problems and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city officials, the cops harassed them. so that was only the beginning of what became the very first culture were anything great here in san francisco. america's first culture where was the civil work in the disco is of between these new forces, social forces that began sweeping the city in the 1960s and 1970s with gays. one step work really took hold, and became quite bloody. i written about the so-called san francisco values weren't born with flowers in their hair. they were born howling. the book i should say does have a happy ending because the city ultimately trying triads. it resolves these differences after very brutal times and with the help of then may
, but it was my recommendation that created the u.s. holocaust memorial museum, the excision that led to that. i -- the commission that led to that. but during the clinton administration, i was ambassador to the european union, and i did as undersecretary all the holocaust negotiations. i negotiated $8 billion of compensation from the swiss, the germans, the austrians for slave labor, forced labor, looted art insurance, property restitution and the like. and here i'm really trying to look at this from the perspective of someone who's been a senior government official but also a leader in the jewish community. and that's why this book has been endorsed by both president perez and president clinton. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's our prime time lineup for tonight. beginning at 7 p.m. eastern time, nobel prize-winning author talks about the history of africa and the challenges facing the continent today. then at 8:15, a look at presidential inaugurations throughout history. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with c
of u.s. aid $3 billion annually. israel is also an occupying power, born of war in which two thirds of the indigenous population was driven from their land, israel went on to expand its borders further in 1967 when it conquered the west bank, the gaza strip and golan heights. there are half a million jewish settlers in the occupied territories who enjoy all manner of state subsidies and privileges while palestinians under occupation suffer indignities and humiliation too numerous to mention. the situation is not much better for palestinian citizens in israel who are increasingly treated as a fifth column despite their loyalty that the state has shown little affection over the years. israel's occupation is the longest in modern history and the israeli government appears to be in no hurry to end it particularly if it can change the topic to iran's nuclear program or the threat of islam. unconditional support for israel is not the only reason the united states is viewed with suspicion and hostility in much of the arab and muslim world but certainly one of the reasons and a very big one
for my daughter." >> host: now joining us on our book tv set in miami is a affirm -- familiar face. brad melt sir. it's not often we talk about lisa simpson and dollie parton and the three stooges. >> i bring only the highest of high brow wherever i go. you're talking to me because of my love for my daughters, and seven years ago, on the night my daughter was born, i did a trick i did for my son. i rote "heroes for my daughter." and when it started writing the book -- on the night i was born, my father bought a bottle of sham page, and he said he would hope it when his son got married. and then my man lost his job and we moved of maryland to florida. we had no job no place to live, nothing. and the stuff you put in your moving van, your clothes, that's your stuff. but the things you keep in your car the movers can't touch, that's your life. the things no one can touch. and when we moved down, my mom and dad in the front, my sister and i in the book, and behind the head rest where we were sitting what two bottles of champagne. and that made it clear, we were their lives, and i remember dr
to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up diving. i've been involved with politics since i was 16 and i go juan iranian television and they go on saudi television discussing world affairs. i also do american television on a radio station talking about world affairs. why? these things are all related. mass behavior among parts having relationship to mass behavior among human beings doesn't make that massive behavior predictable because the mass of behavior builds behavior considerably. it builds on repulsion but in recognizing the commonalities lies a hint of the solution and if you read my first book the lucifer principle, the forces of history, you will see ideas like this applied in ways that relate directly to geopolitics and to economics and if you read my second book global brain, the office from the secretary of defense thought that book was so relevant to these kinds of things that office through a seminar based on the book and brought in people from the energy
easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique funhouse mirror which if i looked at it long enough would reflect back to me, often in hazy, indistinct, distorted forms, images of events, people, places which organized and arranged told the story of 20th century america. as a historian, i'm interested in origin, so i will tell you about the origin of this book. i was a colleague of arthur schlessinger or at the city university of new york. he introduced me to the kennedy family at a -- some event, i don't know what it was, a reception, a dinn
was absolutely fascinating. a good word to use if you don't know if a felon or a hero was fascinating is that it wants to do a biography. by that a year later, i saw jean kennedy smith again. she approached me and wanted me to do it, to write that biography. they recognize there is a need for such a biography. i said well, i'm in the mid-of writing another book by andrew carnegie. she said when he went to to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. i said i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day, we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if nav corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in ses
of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and reverend bliss this day. >> i don't thought that either come over 10 and open a store not offspring and delete, but to people of all ethnicities, classes and that's its appeal, it's mary. >> how is it viewed in the middle east and how is it the reverend bliss opened it? >> all-star with the chronologically earlier one first. there's a lot of suspicion when the school opened in the 1860s. this is run by christian missionaries, americans who didn't have very deep roots in the region, but rather quickly it became apparent to middle easterners who are not just orthodox christians, but this is the best place to get the possible educ
and about and he used to drive about london in his own taxicab and would wear a chauffeur's cap and his protection officer would sit in the back seat. he would love to drive around and being undetected. the clean gets out more than you imagine to have dinner at her friend's home and to have dinner in somebody's kitchen or the older ones who don't have as much money any more, she will go there was just one protection officer. gives her some measure as well. >>host: kansas you are on with sally bedell smith. >> caller: i enjoyed reading your book on princess diana you wrote shortly after she passed away. with your book on the queen did you discover more about her relationship with diana and how you would describe the relationship with princess diana? >>guest: i did discover more. in 1998 shortly after her death that story was from the perspective of diana. but she was very young and immature when she became the princess of wales. the queen made a point* to say she had an open door and she could talk to her, the queen is very busy and diana was intimidated and did not avail herself to that
in the muslim lands we had to add an additional fiction to the book just to cover all of us. this is a huge problem, and that countries with -- where the jews have been dispelled by the most obvious places, because the same thing is happening to the christians now. so that's essentially what i try to get into the last of the book, to go through that. and to say, by the way, christians and jews may have differences, but we look exactly the same through a given site. >> -- gunsight. >> that seems to me, you know, there was one of the things i wanted to bring up your. first about the situation of christians. and especially egyptian christians who, after all, our huge portion of the population. our colleague who would have been here except he was bumped from a flight from cairo, boils down to this, so there's a way in which the situation, in the end they had a place to go. whereas in egypt there's no discrete part of the country which could be christians. except with, kind of dislocations, so that's going to be -- >> there's no israel for christians. >> but it also, i think, i think it's actual
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20